Search for a place to ride your bike in Oregon

Search by

Enter a Location

Examples: Portland or 555 State St. Salem 55025

or

The 7 regions of Oregon

Ride Options

Select a Ride Type

Off-road, often dirt

Paved roads or paths

Gravel roads or paths

Our best roads, by bike

Select a Ride Length (in miles)

Sandy Ridge Trail System

  • Length:
    6.5 miles
  • Difficulty:
    Challenging
  • Nearby Cities:
    Sandy
  • Region:
    Greater Portland, Mt. Hood / The Gorge
  • Attributes:
    Moderately Technical, Single-Track, Technical

Trailhead Elevation: 1047 ft

Elevation Chart

Powered by Ride With GPS

For more information and to obtain an export of this ride, visit RideWithGPS.com.

Directions

Get directions to the trailhead on Google Maps

In Oregon, a bicycle is legally considered a vehicle, and the same Oregon road laws apply. Please “be seen” and practice safe riding. Vehicle traffic, farm equipment and narrow shoulders exist on many Oregon roads, and you may find that construction projects, traffic or other events may cause road conditions or signage to differ from the map results, ride descriptions and directions. For travel options plus weather and road conditions, visit tripcheck.com, call 511 (in Oregon only), 800.977.6368 or 503.588.2941. Routes listed on this website are for informational purposes and intended as a reference guide only.

The Sandy Ridge trail area brings a welcome resource to the west side of Mt. Hood — it’s an easy drive from Portland, and the trails were all built and designed for flow. The trails are low enough on the mountain to stay open about 10 months a year; they’re designed to drain water and hold up to mud.

There are currently 15 miles of purpose-built mountain bike trails open to the public. Trails range in technical difficulty and offer world-class opportunities for riders of all skill levels. The Sandy Ridge system has become a national model in sustainable trail design practices and offers visitors to the Portland metro area virtual year-round access to some of the most unique riding opportunities in the country.

Trail experiences include the hand-sculpted Hide and Seek Trail — an intermediate, four-mile descent dropping from an elevation of 2,280 feet to 1,120 with roots, rocks, rollers and jumps built into the trail. Laura’s Loop Trail, a 0.75-mile beginner circuit near the gate, has smooth, easy trails but some moderate inclines. And the most recent addition to the system, Two Turntables and a Microwave Trail, is a gravity-focused, machine-built roller coaster through the woods that incorporates a flow-optimized build with classic single-track elements.

The newest trail, Follow the Leader and Flow Motion, continues to push the progressive trail design and build boundaries further.

Directions: From the east side of Sandy, head east on U.S. Highway 26 (Mount Hood Highway) for 11.4 miles. Turn left on Sleepy Hollow Drive soon after a large sign indicating a left turn for Marmot. NOTE: This will be the second turn-off for Sleepy Hollow. Once on Sleepy Hollow, go 0.3 miles and turn right on E. Barlow Trail Road and over the Sandy River. After 1 mile on E. Barlow Trail Road, look for a gate blocking Homestead Road/2-6E-23 on your left. Trails intersect with the paved Homestead Road north of the gate. Cars do not need a Northwest Forest Pass to park.

For more information:

http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/recreation/site_info.php?siteid=395

Download a PDF flyer and trail map:

Sandy Ridge trail map

Learn more about the 7 Bikes for 7 Wonders Scavenger Hunt

Photos of this Ride

Comments

  1. Great ride. Hit the El Burro Loco afterwards in Welches. Great food, excellent draft beer selection.

  2. […] was part of the crew responsible for designing and building the extremely successful Sandy Ridge Trail System near Mt. Hood, and is almost finished with the design phase of a new riding area just off I-5 in […]

  3. […] Hood is a mountain biker’s dream — and you can shred to your heart’s content at the Sandy Ridge System or Surveyor’s […]

  4. […] the shadow of the 11,250-foot peak of Mount Hood in a lush and dense Pacific Northwest forest, the Sandy Ridge trail network combines old school riding feel with a touch of new school flow. Designed and built with assistance […]

  5. […] the shadow of the 11,250-foot peak of Mount Hood in a lush and dense Pacific Northwest forest, the Sandy Ridge trail network combines old school riding feel with a touch of new school flow. Designed and built with assistance […]

  6. […] the shadow of the 11,250-foot peak of Mount Hood in a lush and dense Pacific Northwest forest, the Sandy Ridge trail network combines old school riding feel with a touch of new school flow. Designed and built with assistance […]

  7. […] had a simple goal, go to Sandy Ridge – Ride up to Flow Motion, hit Lower Hide and Seek, and call it a day.  The climb was so […]

Share this Trail